Biomol Ther (Seoul)  
Synthetic Cannabinoid-Induced Immunosuppression Augments Cerebellar Dysfunction in Tetanus-Toxin Treated Mice
Jaesuk Yun*, Sun Mi Gu, Tac-hyung Lee, Yun Jeong Song, Seonhwa Seong, Young-Hoon Kim, Hye Jin Cha, Kyoung Moon Han, Jisoon Shin, Hokyung Oh, Kikyung Jung, Chiyoung Ahn, Hye-Kyung Park and Hyung Soo Kim
National Institute of Food and Drug Safety Evaluation, Ministry of Food and Drug Safety, Cheongju 28159, Republic of Korea
E-mail: actpotyjs@korea.kr
Tel: +82-43-719-5205, Fax: +82-43-719-5200
Received: May 31, 2016; Revised: July 14, 2016; Accepted: August 4, 2016; Published online: November 25, 2016.
© The Korean Society of Applied Pharmacology. All rights reserved.

Abstract
Synthetic cannabinoids are one of most abused new psychoactive substances. The recreational use of abused drug has aroused serious concerns about the consequences of these drugs on infection. However, the effects of synthetic cannabinoid on resistance to tetanus toxin are not fully understood yet. In the present study, we aimed to determine if the administration of synthetic cannabinoids increase the susceptibility to tetanus toxin-induced motor behavioral deficit and functional changes in cerebellar neurons in mice. Furthermore, we measured T lymphocytes markers levels, such as CD8 and CD4 which against tetanus toxin. JWH-210 administration decreased expression levels of T cell activators including cluster of differentiation (CD) 3ε, CD3γ, CD74p31, and CD74p41. In addition, we demonstrated that JWH-210 induced motor impairment and decrement of vesicle-associated membrane proteins 2 levels in the cerebellum of mice treated with tetanus toxin. Furthermore, cerebellar glutamatergic neuronal homeostasis was hampered by JWH-210 administration, as evidenced by increased glutamate concentration levels in the cerebellum. These results suggest that JWH-210 may increase the vulnerability to tetanus toxin via the regulation of immune function.
Keywords: New psychoactive substances, Cytokine, T cell activator, Tetanus toxin, Motor impairment, Glutamate


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